Skipsea – Isle of Ships

Following our exploration of the north and north-west sources of the River Hull we followed the river’s tributaries north-east to Skipsea and Barmston. Skipsea is the site of one of the most recent major discoveries in British archaeology – hidden in plain sight for hundreds of years. Have a look at the link. If you would like to share memories of life on and around the River Hull for ‘Open Bridges: A River Full Of Stories’ get in touch.

Open Bridges

Open Bridges: A River Full Of Stories – gathering stories to preserve the heritage of the River Hull, its bridges and the people and vessels which have used it over the years.

Skipsea Skipsea Iron-Age mound and Church

Following on from visiting the north and north-western sources of the River Hull, last weekend we followed the river’s tributaries north-east to Skipsea and Barmston. Skipsea is the site of one of the most recent major discoveries in British archaeology. Hidden in plain sight for hundreds of years, Reading University confirmed in 2016 that the Norman motte and bailey castle was in fact a massive 2,500 year old Iron Age burial mound.

Click the video to join us sitting sunshine looking at Skipsea mound waiting for the sun to set, imagining it’s past lives…

So the mound re-purposed by Drogo de la Beuvrière in 1086 after the Norman Conquest, Skipsea meaning “Isle of Ships”…

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